Deactivating Implicit Bias, Eliminating Treatment Disparities in Oncology: The Road Ahead

A new Alliance to Advance Patient-Centered Cancer Care Webinar

Our society places white culture, ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and actions above all others. A series of tragic events have brought this critical issue back into the public consciousness. Health care professionals, like many others, are striving to bring about lasting change. Naturally focused on helping others, clinical care teams all over the country have been explicitly working on becoming better allies to their vulnerable and underserved patients. Despite their best efforts, many are still manifesting what the experts refer to as implicit bias, or prejudicial and racist thoughts embedded into an individual’s mind on a subconscious, perhaps hidden level. These automatic judgments can significantly affect the way minority patients experience the health care system, from spending less time with physicians than their white counterparts to feeling less involved in decision-making regarding treatment.

The Alliance to Advance Patient-Centered Cancer Care is bringing together two experts to discuss treatment disparities in clinical oncology and beyond, highlighting key interventions and relevant research. Dr. Jeff Stone will provide a comprehensive overview of implicit bias, illustrating how verbal and non-verbal behavior can affect patient-provider communication, with a special focus on Hispanic and Latinx patients in Southern Arizona. From the Mount Sinai Health System, Dr. Cardinale Smith will discuss her experience working to eliminate barriers to care in palliative care settings, where Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) experience significant issues accessing hospice care and adequate pain management.

What: Alliance to Advance Patient-Centered Cancer Care Webinar –Deactivating Implicit Bias, Eliminating Treatment Disparities in Oncology: The Road Ahead.
When: Friday, October 30 | 1:00 PM ET/10:00 AM MT
Register by: Monday, October 26, 2020
Cost: The webinar is free for all attendees




Cardinale Smith, MD, PhD
Chief Quality Officer for Cancer Services, Mount Sinai Health System
Associate Professor, Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology
Associate Professor, Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Artboard 2Cardinale B. Smith, MD, PhD is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology and the Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Chief Quality Officer for Cancer Services, Mount Sinai Health System. She is a medical oncologist and palliative care physician whose clinical practice is focused on lung cancer and palliative care. Her research interests focus on doctor-patient communication, evaluating treatment disparities in cancer care, determinants of cancer patients’ quality of care, characterizing barriers to optimal cancer and palliative care and developing approaches to eliminating those barriers among racial and ethnic minorities.

Dr. Smith is a 2013 recipient of a mentored research scholar grant from the American Cancer Society to evaluate determinants of disparities in the utilization of palliative care among patients with lung cancer. She was a co-investigator on a Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute grant to teach and enable goals of care conversations among oncologists.  Additionally, she is the current recipient Sojourn’s Scholar Leadership Grant to evaluate the role of bias among oncologists on minority cancer patient outcomes. Dr. Smith has had numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals, and in 2015 was named one of the Top 40 Inspirational Leaders under 40 by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

Learn more about Dr. Smith here.

Jeff Stone, PhD
University of Arizona Distinguished Professor in Psychology and Psychiatry
Director, Self and Attitudes Laboratory
Director, Social Psychology of Sport Laboratory
Research Associate, Arizona Cancer Center (Cancer Prevention and Control)

Artboard 1Jeff Stone, PhD, is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology in the College of Science, and of Psychiatry in the College of Medicine, at the University of Arizona.  He earned his B.A. in Psychology at San Jose State University, his PhD in Psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and completed 4 years of postdoctoral study in the Department of Psychology at Princeton University.

Dr. Stone has devoted most of his career in experimental social psychology to investigating the mechanisms of health attitude and behavior change, and to understanding the role that implicit prejudice and stereotyping plays in the cancer health disparities. Dr. Stone’s currently funded research on cancer health disparities focuses on (1) the implicit biases that providers hold toward stigmatized cancer patients, (2) how implicit biases toward stigmatized cancer patients impacts medical decisions and interactions related to cancer prevention (e.g., smoking cessation), and (3) if having providers complete workshops on the psychology of implicit bias can reduce the effect of implicit bias on the care they provide for cancer patients.

Learn more about Dr. Stone here.